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Archives » Hispanic

Upfront TV: HD Ads Untapped | Fox Business Nukes Lineup | Hallmark Weighs Scripted Show

Published 2 years, 2 months ago
  • The bleeding stops at Fox’s “American Idol,” reports Media Life. “Idol” on Wednesday averaged a 6.0 rating among adults 18-49 rating, level with week's 6.0, and taking the night’s top spot; second in place was ABC's "Modern Family" at 5.5. “Idol” has slid 9% and higher in the previous two weeks, still, that 6.0 pales in comparison to last year’s 8.4 in the same week. 
  • No hints as to what the series will be, but Hallmark Channel is considering its first scripted prime-time series, reports Ad Age. Hallmark’s only original content thus far is its movies, and an upcoming 13-episode inspirational series hosted by poet Maya Angelou. To now, Hallmark has essentially surrendered prime time, and Its current prime time lineup consists of episodes of “Little House on the Prairie” and “Frasier.”
  • Fox Business Network has canceled its entire prime-time lineup (all political talk shows), reports the New York Times, effective February 20. The channel averaged 54,000 total viewers in prime time in 2011, while rival business news channel CNBC attracted 228,000 viewers. Gone are “Freedom Watch,” with Andrew Napolitano, “Power & Money,” a business/politics show with David Asman, and “Follow the Money” with Eric Bolling, a strong critic of President Obama. All will stay as contributors, but new shows featuring Gerri Willis, Neil Cavuto and Lou Dobbs (which air in the 5-8pm slot, and with decent ratings) will be rebroadcast.
  • It’s been tough casting finding the new Fred and Lilly, so NBC has pushed back production of its “Munsters” pilot to June, reports Deadline Hollywood. The new version, called “Mocking Bird Lane,” was written by Bryan Fuller of “Pushing Up Daisies,” and reportedly focuses upon Eddie Munster hitting puberty. 
  • High-def ads have yet to catch on among brands, reports Adweek, with notable holdouts like Geico Insurance. Digital media-services company DG estimates that just 16% of TV ads are aired in HD. But Kantar Media research believes that costs advertisers $8.2 billion in impressions per year. Their research discovered that viewers are far more likely to stick with HD spots, and retention for HD spots was 18% higher than those in standard definition. 
  • The Super Bowl analytics continue. Nielsen is reporting that Super Bowl  XLVI set a record for Hispanic viewership, with an average 10.4 million Hispanic fans tuning in, reports TVByTheNumbers. The 10.4 million average viewership marks the second consecutive Super Bowl with at least 10 million Hispanic viewers and a 68% jump from Super Bowl XLI five years ago (6.2 million Hispanic viewers for the Feb. 4, 2007 game).

 

Nielsen Reports: How Americans Spend Media Time and Money

Published 2 years, 2 months ago

Americans are spending 33+ hours per week watching video, and across numerous screens, according to the just-issued Nielsen Cross Platform Report. That is a lot of media time, but where to buy ad time? It depends who you are attempting to reach. Older viewers watch the most television. Young viewers are watching less, but as The New York Times describes it, "Youths are watching, but less often on TV." 

Nielsen reported data for Q3 2010 and Q3 2011, year-over-year (YOY), and as Nielsen describes it, “changes are afoot” as consumers seek the options that make the most sense for them (usually depending upon their comfort with the Internet, or household income).

Younger viewers are spending less time watching TV, at 120.56 minutes per month, while those over 55 watch the most at 195.10 minutes per month. But the total viewer time is more even, taking into account mobile media and online. The upshot, says TechCrunch, is that “the issue isn’t as simple as switching from one medium to another,” for example, from TV to TV-over-Internet. Rather, with a “plethora of new TV consumption choices,” the mix is inconsistent, even among viewers in the same household.

Three quarters (75.3%) surveyed pay for broadband Internet, up from 70.9% in 2011. Fully 90.4% pay for cable, telco-provided TV or satellite. Also, homes with both paid TV and broadband increased 5.5% since last year.

The number of homes subscribing to wired cable decreased 4.1% over the past 12 months, while telco-provided and satellite TV increased by 21.1% and 2.1%.

Although they comprise less than 5% of TV households, homes with both broadband Internet and broadcast TV are on the rise, having grown 22.8% over the last year. In those households, viewers stream twice as much video content as do the average households, and watch half as much broadcast TV.

Among other findings for Q3 2011, YOY:

  • Households watching time-shifted TV increased by 65.9% YOY
  • Mobile video viewing increased by 205.7% increase in users
  • TV over Internet increased by 21.7%
  • Asian wired cable subscribers declined from nearly 66% to 51%
  • 12% of Asians opt for telco delivery, up 3% YOY
  • Hispanic homes are more likely to be broadcast only at 15%, or satellite connected at 34%, than any other ethnic demographic.

 

Upfront TV: “NCIS” at 200 | Super Bowl Tops Itself | “Voice” Soars | Hispanic News, English Language

Published 2 years, 2 months ago
  • Kudos to CBS and “NCIS,” which tonight will air its 200th episode. The Navy/legal drama debuted in 2003, with actor Mark Harmon at the helm, who was best known for his work on NBC’s “St. Elsewhere,” and as a hunk-for-hire on such shows as “The West Wing.” “NCIS” has defied the approaching-a-decade malaise, delivering an average 22.7 million viewers for new episodes this season. 100 episodes is industry standard to reach syndication level. The record number of episodes in history television belongs to “Gunsmoke,” which ran for 20 seasons and 635 episodes.
  • Super Bowl XLVI attracted a record 111.3 million total viewers, reports Media Life, to become the most-watched broadcast in television history. This is the third year running that the Super Bowl has set the record, held until 2010 by the series finale of "M*A*S*H" in 1983. It was also the highest-rated Super Bowl in 26 years, with an average 47.0 household rating and 71 share. The game took a 40.5 share among adults 18-49.
  • The post-Super Bowl Season 2 premiere of “The Voice” on NBC took a 16.3 rating adult 18-49 rating, and 37.61 million viewers, reports TVByTheNumbers. This was NBC’s best rating for an entertainment telecast since the “Friends” finale in 2004, with a 24.9 share.
  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has ruled that NBC’s WMAQ-TV Chicago had a right to deny long-shot GOP presidential candidate Randall Terry a Super Bowl ad spot, reports Broadcasting & Cable. FCC ruled that while broadcasters must make ad time available to qualified candidates, WMAQ judged fairly that Terry was unqualified, given his showing at the polls. The ad reportedly contained graphic images of aborted fetuses, which Terry believed was behind the denial.
  • Univision and Disney are in talks for a Latino-oriented 24-hour cable news channel, in English. As TVNewsCheck reports, neither company will confirm or discuss the project, but are likely to launch the channel in time for the November presidential election. The 2010 census revealed that U.S. born Latinos comprise nearly 60% of the growth among U.S. Hispanics over the last decade, and that an increasing number speak English as a first language.

Online Ads: Poll Finds 15 Seconds the Limit for Consumers

Published 2 years, 3 months ago

Consumers understand that free content online is supported by advertising. But the majority at 54% considers 15 seconds the limit for in-stream and online ads, according to a survey by Poll Position. The company conducted a survey of 1,179 registered U.S. voters.

Of those polled, 54% felt that 15 seconds was acceptable, and 12% went as high as 30 seconds. But the numbers climb even higher, when you exclude the 27% who had no opinion. Of those who do have an opinion—

  • 73% find 15 seconds acceptable;
  • 5% find 30 seconds acceptable.

Demographic Divides

Interestingly, the figures were fairly close for male versus female voters and Republicans versus Democrats. But some significant demographic differences emerged.

Consumers in the 30-44 age group had the highest tolerance for 15-second ads, at 60.5%. Those in the 65+ demographic are far less patient, and only 40.1% of those consumers find 15 seconds acceptable, versus the 54.1% mean.

Among ethnic groups, 60.3% of white consumers find 15 seconds acceptable, but only 40.1% of Hispanics, and 33.3% of African-American respondents.

“Work It” Pink Slipped, “Walking Dead” Bloats

Published 2 years, 3 months ago

ABC has cancelled the cross-dressing comedy Work It after two barely-watched episodes. The network made the announcement over the weekend, and after a weak second episode rating of less than 5 million viewers and a 1.5 rating among adults 18-49. The sitcom put two men in drag to get work as pharmaceutical sales reps, a woman-dominated field. Work It was plagued with bad press from the start. First it was derided as a ripoff of the 1980s Bosom Buddies, starring young Tom Hanks. It alienated Latino viewers with one-liners like “I’m Puerto Rican, I’d be great at selling drugs,” which drew protesters to picket outside of ABC’s New York headquarters. Finally, it drew the ire of GLAAD and other lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender advocacy groups, including the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), which placed a full-page ad in The Daily Variety complaining of “inaccurate or offensive images.”

No complaints surround The Walking Dead on AMC. The cable network announced over the weekend that it will order 16 episodes of the apocalyptic zombie drama for season three, up from 13 episodes for seasons one and two. Its November mid-season finale went out with a 3.5 rating among adults 18-49. Season two resumes on February 12. The network will use that premiere as a lead-in to its newest unscripted series, Comic Book Men, at 10pm ET/PT.  The comedy is set in a neighborhood comic book store, and lampoons the fanboy culture (ironically, the culture that made Walking Dead a success as a graphic novel, before it was picked up by television).

Chart: Top 10 Cable TV Engagement , Week of July 11-17, 2011

Published 2 years, 8 months ago

Top 10 Cable TV Engagement

About this chart: Content in Rentrak updates is produced and/or compiled by Rentrak Corporation and its TV Essentials data collection and analytical service. The “Stickiness” Index is the average percentage of the program viewed, divided by the average percentage viewed for all programs of that duration (i.e. 30 min, 60 min, or 120 min).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart: Top 10 Broadcast TV Engagement List, Week of July 4-10, 2011

Published 2 years, 9 months ago

Top 10 Broadcast TV Engagement List

About this chart: Content in Rentrak updates is produced and/or compiled by Rentrak Corporation and its TV Essentials data collection and analytical service. The “Stickiness” Index is the average percentage of the program viewed, divided by the average percentage viewed for all programs of that duration (i.e. 30 min, 60 min, or 120 min). Monday-Sunday primetime (8pm-11pm) and Sunday primetime (7pm-11pm) programs, includes roll up of air times. Excludes local programming and all premium non ad-supported channels.

 

 

 

 

 

Quepasa, Spanish-Portuguese Community Site, Buys myYearbook

Published 2 years, 9 months ago
  • Quepasa, the Spanish and Portuguese community site and social gaming operator, will buy teen socnet myYearbook for $100 million. While the first real challenge to Facebook’s social networking hegemony has recently come from Google+, myYearbook and Quepasa have attempted to carve respective niches within the community site sphere, suggesting that the space still has room for relatively smaller players, writes Paid Content. myYearbook claims to have about 25 million users currently—a veritable drop in the bucket to Facebook’s 750 million members. 

  • Addressing investors on a conference call today, Yahoo suggested turmoil among its sales force played a major role in its reduced performance -- down about 5% in Q2. U.S. display revenues were "unexpectedly down," while display revenues in Europe and Asia continued to grow. As a result of its staffing issues the company said much of its premium inventory - typically packaged and sold direct to advertisers and agencies - was instead pushed through its exchange during the quarter, garnering diminished revenues, reports ClickZ News.

  • Behavioral targeting spending has been growing 20% a year or more for years and is forecast by eMarketer to keep growing at that pace through 2014. In fact, because of the utility of BT, banner ads may surpass search ads in revenues by 2015 after many years of relative decline. The big challenge remains privacy concerns, and the two bills in Congress are looking to limit the data harvesting. Facebook, Google, and also demand-side ad platforms, are affected, according to Forbes.com.

Chart: Top 10 Broadcast TV Engagement List, Week of June 27-July 3, 2011

Published 2 years, 9 months ago

Top 10 Broadcast TV Engagement List

About this chart: Content in Rentrak updates is produced and/or compiled by Rentrak Corporation and its TV Essentials data collection and analytical service. The “Stickiness” Index is the average percentage of the program viewed, divided by the average percentage viewed for all programs of that duration (i.e. 30 min, 60 min, or 120 min). Monday-Sunday primetime (8pm-11pm) and Sunday primetime (7pm-11pm) programs, includes roll up of air times. Excludes local programming and all premium non ad-supported channels.

 

 

 

 

 

Chart: Top 10 Broadcast TV Engagement List, Week of June 20-26, 2011

Published 2 years, 9 months ago

About this chart: Content in Rentrak updates is produced and/or compiled by Rentrak Corporation and its TV Essentials data collection and analytical service. The “Stickiness” Index is the average percentage of the program viewed, divided by the average percentage viewed for all programs of that duration (i.e. 30 min, 60 min, or 120 min). Monday-Sunday primetime (8pm-11pm) and Sunday primetime (7pm-11pm) programs, includes roll up of air times. Excludes local programming and all premium non ad-supported channels.